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Blogs and Articles

Vermont spends $310M of CARES funds helping businesses– will Delaware?

Two months into its emergency order, Delaware has yet to reveal what help businesses may receive and how as we recover from the coronavirus, while other states are offering hope.

An upcoming episode of A Better Delaware’s livestream seriesA Better Discussionwill feature Betsy Bishop, President of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce to discuss Vermont Governor Phil Scott’s recently announced $400 million economic relief and recovery package (stay tuned on our Facebook page for an announcement of the date).

The proposal, funded by the $1.25 billion the state received from the Federal CARES Act, includes $310 million for immediate emergency relief to the most impacted sectors and businesses, as well as $90 million in long-term recovery investments, and offers support for Vermont businesses includes funding for financial, housing, and technical assistance.

“These ideas are the result of talking to many local employers over the last two months to identify what they need now, and what they will need on the other side of this,” said Agency of Commerce Secretary Lindsay Kurrle.

In Delaware, we have yet to take any similar action.

State leaders requested flexibility in use of CARES funds, with no plan in place for how to use it.

In Tuesday’s episode of A Better Discussion, guest Bob Older, President of the Delaware Small Business Chamber of Commerce, expressed that when it came to Delaware’s response to the virus, “our small businesses were left in the dark.”

Older continued, saying businesses have been forced to remain closed for longer than was necessary, and much to the detriment of their operations and ability to reopen. The two month long stay at home order will force many businesses to shutter permanently.

Delaware was near last in the nation in the U.S. Small Business Administration Paycheck Protection Program funds and offered state assistance through the H.E.L.P. loans, only to the hospitality industry, leaving many businesses helpless. State reserves, such as the $252.4 million in our Rainy Day Fund, tens of millions in the Strategic Fund, and $126.3 million from budget smoothing weren’t utilized to help either.

As we continue to wait for a phased reopening and an announcement of an economic plan, watching other states move forward with economic and business assistance feels like salt in the wound—a wound that has been left open for far too long.

Unfortunately, this isn’t the only instance of Delaware lagging behind in an economic response during the virus. Other states launched business and economic task forces weeks before announcing stay at home orders, whereas Delaware’s Governor joined with other states in a task force weeks after forcing businesses to close, and has yet to proceed with a state-focused initiative.

Early on, state leaders responded to industry pleas by telling them that the health side was their only priority, and businesses would have to wait.

Two months later, and with other states pushing forward, you have to wonder: just how long are our floundering businesses and 100,000 unemployed Delawareans expected to wait for our state leaders to act?

Harm vs. Good

The past six weeks have been an difficult and trying time. Jobs are being lost, businesses are closing, and the rules seem to change by the day.

A Better Delaware has been committed to advocating for you, your jobs, and your businesses at this time. We have been working to keep Delawareans informed and aware of the ever-changing situation.

Part of this effort has been hosting a recurring livestream series entitled A Better Discussion, where we cover current issues with experts in order to better inform the residents of the First State.

This week, we were pleased to have Dr. Michael Peterson, Chair of the Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition at the University of Delaware join us for a candid discussion about the response to COVID-19 and its lasting impact on health and the economy.

Dr. Peterson shared what you won’t hear from many local leaders: much of our response has been ill-advised and more detrimental than the virus itself.

To start, you don’t quarantine the healthy, you quarantine the sick. We overreacted, and the reaction to a situation does not prove the severity of it. In this case, we continue to stand by our initial actions without the hubris to admit we were wrong.

Not only were we wrong in closing our economy, but we were wrong to ignore the unintended consequences of the policies enacted.

He went on to say that economic health is a driving force for individual health, making unemployment a health risk that leads to other detrimental health issues. These include anxiety, depression, opiate use, domestic violence, suicide, and more.

With recent unemployment numbers showing employment down nationally by 20.5M jobs, and an unemployment rate of 14.7%, the lasting impact of the response to the virus may be worse than the coronavirus.

In Delaware, unemployment claims increased 2244.31% from the start of COVID-19 through April.

As for the determination of “essential businesses,” for business owners, their businesses are essential because it is their livelihood. For workers, their jobs are essential because it is how they support themselves and their families, find purpose, and more.

Dr. Peterson was clear that keeping vulnerable populations—such as the chronically ill and the elderly—safe was very important to managing the coronavirus and keeping death tolls low. He believes we could have done this easily without shutting down and forcing people out of work.

As for re-opening, a full opening is likely best. He advocated for businesses to be allowed to do what they do best: adapt, thrive, and weigh risks.

Unfortunately, the damage has been done to the economy and it will take a while to recover. Printing money, shortages, and loss of work/business will have hard impacts on recovery.

Check out the full episode here.

Open letter to Gov. Carney from business leaders

On May 6, Delaware business leaders authored a letter to Governor Carney requesting the opportunity to inform reopening decisions. The Delaware Business Roundtable and Delaware State Chamber of Commerce believe:

“the combination of a carefully considered, phased reopening of Delaware businesses and the implementation of a series of strategic, long-term policy changes will put Delaware and our citizens in a healthy and economically secure position in the future.”

The letter was released a day after the Governor announced plans to allow some small businesses to resume operations, beginning as early as May 8. While this is a step towards economic recovery from COVID-19, it is only one of many to come.

A path to recovery informed by business leaders—who understand firsthand the urgency of the economic strain—is perhaps the best step towards recovery that we could take at this time.

The two groups are offering a phased reopening guide for businesses to be sent to their memberships, and a series of policy recommendations to jumpstart the economy. “Creative use” of federal stimulus funds were also mentioned in their vision for strengthening Delaware’s economy, workforce, and business community post-coronavirus.

Delaware’s emergency order has been extended through May 31, as many business owners and workers fear for their livelihoods as each new day dwindles their reserves.

The time to partner with the business community was likely long ago, but it is better late than never to do so.

We hope the Governor and other state leaders accept the guidance being offered in order to protect Delawareans and the First State’s future.

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Proposals:

COVID-19 Best Practices

Putting Delaware Back to Work: Economic Recovery in the First State

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Read the letter below:

Dear Governor Carney: 

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and the necessary restrictions on economic activity enacted by the State, The Delaware Business Roundtable and the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce have been working together to provide our assistance to safely and responsibly enable a phased reopening of Delaware’s economy. At the outset, we want to be clear that we believe any action to reopen the economy must follow public health guidance to be certain Delaware does not experience a resurgence and put additional pressure on the state’s healthcare system. 

We are writing today to offer two specific pieces of work: 

  • COVID-19 Best Practices: This is a guidance document for Delaware’s business community, developed after surveying and discussing these issues with businesses statewide. We believe this document will provide a basic guide to businesses outlining essential activities they must consider as they execute a phased reopening. We are working to disseminate this document widely to our members and beyond; 
  • Putting Delaware Back to Work: Economic Recovery in the First StateThis is a series of strategic, long-term policy recommendations with consideration that the economic recovery from the pandemic will take far longer than any of us may have initially imagined. Thus, now is the time to make meaningful public policy changes and investments so that we can jumpstart efforts to create a higher skilled workforce, a streamlined regulatory approval process, easy access to broadband, and more. 

Many agree that the pandemic has brought to light some of the challenges Delaware faces in competing with other states for jobs, talent and investment. The goal is clear: we should act with urgency now! Why? So that in two or three years we can look back and assert unequivocally that in the midst of a national crisis Delaware leaders – representing both state and business interests – acted responsibly in the short term and also took the long view to put Delaware on a forward-looking, carefully considered path that resulted in economic prosperity for all Delawareans. We believe that, working closely with you and the General Assembly, many of the proposals articulated in the attached document should be enacted within the next 30 days as a means of generating jobs. As has been said before, we should never let a serious crisis go to waste; it’s an opportunity to do things we think we could not do before. 

Given the state revenue update from DEFAC on Monday, making such investments will represent a considerable challenge. However, the combination of a carefully considered, phased reopening of Delaware businesses and the implementation of a series of strategic, long-term policy changes will put Delaware and our citizens in a healthy and economically secure position in the future. With appropriate spending prioritization, creative use of federal stimulus funds and a careful balance between use of state operating funds and the state’s bonding authority, we are certain that Delaware can meet this challenge. 

As our State has seen in the past, a focused public-private partnership can surmount the most difficult challenges. Accordingly, we look forward to working collaboratively with you and your team on these urgent matters. 

Taxes and Spending: The Real Economic Impact

DEFAC estimates show Delaware’s revenues for FY 2020 down by $416M and FY 2021 revenues down by $273.3M, creating a deficit of about $748.7M. Governor Carney expects as much as $500M to $1B in lost revenues.

In 2017, Delaware increased spending and raised taxes to answer a $400M deficit.

Increasing spending with such a high deficit is irresponsible. As for taxes, asking businesses and workers to fork over money when businesses have been forced to exact layoffs, limit operations, or even close seems incomprehensible, but Delaware leaders are considering doing just that.

On Monday, Delaware Department of Labor Secretary Cerron Cade said higher unemployment taxes (paid by businesses) could be implemented to refresh funding for unemployment benefits. According to Secretary Cade, the total for these benefits could be $850M over the next three months alone.

Looming tax hikes aren’t our only concern as we push forward. If we look at how the current leadership has handled deficits in the past, Delawareans can expect to see spending for projects that could have been delayed until the state was stable again. Some argue this is how we jumpstart economic growth.

According to an article in Forbes:

“More government spending has been widely-touted as a cure for unemployment, but support for that view seems to be eroding…there isn’t any net gain from government spending since it’s offset by the taxes needed to pay for it, taxes that reduce private sector spending.”

For example, massive spending hikes in the 1930s, 1960s, and 1970s all failed to spawn economic growth, but in the 1980s and 1990s—when federal government spending shrank—the U.S. economy enjoyed one of its greatest expansions.

Some government spending is beneficial, but only if government spending does not crowd out similar private spending, and only is spent wisely, such as education, job training, physical infrastructure, and research and development. In general, government expenditures can weaken the private sector by unproductively allocating resources and thus slowing income growth.

Government spending is entwined with taxes, and high tax rates reduce incentives to work, save, and invest. This leads to a less motivated workforce and less business investment in new capital and technology. Few government expenditures boost productivity enough to offset that lost due to taxes.

So why do our leaders insist on additional spending?

It boils down to politics. New spending programs seem to benefit those who implement them more than those who pay for them.

In a ploy to avoid cutting spending, the state has requested federal funds. Delaware leaders jointly sent a letter to Delaware’s congressional delegation asking for flexibility with how the state can spend more than $1B in stimulus funds.

The National Governor’s Association (NGA) also submitted a formal request to Congress for federal aid to offset state deficits. This request has been denied for now, with leaders arguing that if states face budget woes, it is due to decades of fiscal mismanagement.

Instead of returning time and time again with more taxes coupled with new spending, the state government can be responsible and allocate surpluses to reserves or implement reviews to assess the need and efficiency of certain programs.

If this had been the response in 2017, we may have been more prepared to weather this storm.

Delaware has been shut down for 38 days with no real end in sight, and the President has recommended an incremental reopening strategy. Seventeen percent of small businesses said that they would have to close down or sell if they experienced two-month loss in revenue, according to the latest Small Business Credit Survey.

They need help, not taxes or spending programs.

Unfortunately, we cannot turn back time. All we can do is move forward in a way that is financially sound in the short- and long-term, and in a manner that does not add undue burden to taxpayers and businesses.

Will Delaware raise taxes by $200M again?

The Delaware Economic and Financial Advisory Council (DEFAC) released the updated revenue forecast for fiscal year 2020 this week, and the outlook is dim. DEFAC estimates show Delaware’s revenues for FY 2020 down by $416M and FY 2021 revenues down by $273.3M, creating a deficit of about $748.7M, but that may not be the final impact.

The sentiment was clear in Monday’s DEFAC meeting: there are many factors in play impacting financial futures. The shape of the recovery curve, process of reopening, unemployment numbers, business closures, use of federal funds, and endless more items can impact the ability to recover from COVID-19. Governor Carney expects as much as $500M to $1B in lost revenues.

For Delaware, the worries don’t stop there. A Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia index report predicted Delaware to be one of 9 states with an economy predicted to shrink in the first half of 2020. Delaware also ranks 45thin the nation for short-term fiscal stability, which is bad news for budgeting legislators and struggling businesses and residents.

Before the pandemic, Delaware saw unemployment rise for six months straight and above the national average and was 34thfor employment. Now, more than 71,000 Delawareans have filed for unemployment since the pandemic began, as businesses shut down or laid off workers.

Unfortunately, instead of meeting to make difficult decisions to cut current spending or tap into reserves, our leaders decided to wait for a Hail Mary from federal funding. These funds cannot be used to offset lost revenue, and Delaware’s leaders are scrambling.

Lawmakers faced a similar struggle in 2017, when Delaware’s deficit was close to $400M. Later, in 2018, Governor Carney said:

“We are presenting a balanced, long-term solution to Delaware’s structural budget challenges that will keep Delaware economically competitive. This proposal requires shared sacrifice – and that starts with a commitment by state government to operate more efficiently and spend taxpayer dollars wisely…”

Despite this claim, spending cuts and sacrifices were temporary. The real sacrifice came from Delawareans who saw new and higher taxes totaling $200M in new annual revenue.

When Delaware recovered, the taxes remained and the new “surplus” became an excuse to continue spending.

Now that Delaware faces a deficit that is double what we saw in 2017, Office of Management and Budget Director Mike Jackson says that postponing planned capital projects and accessing reserves may be part of the answer, however, “All options are going to be on the table.”

This signals that the response may resemble 2017, and Delawareans could foot the bill through higher taxes.

In 2017, it was only the state government in crisis. Now, it is every Delawarean.

Taxes should not have been the answer in 2017, and cannot be the answer in 2020. We cannot ask more from those who have already been forced to close their businesses, who have been laid off work, and who cannot afford to answer for the consequences of poor financial planning and action from state officials.

Cutting the $233M in recently proposed one-time capital expenditures, utilizing the $252.4M in Rainy Day Funds and $126.3M in Budget Stabilization Funds, reallocating the tens of millions in the Strategic Fund, freezing agency budgets, suspending budget increases, and a critical look at our spending habits are the key to our recovery.

We have the ability to afford this pandemic without increasing taxes.

The question is: will we?

First State Last in Federal Assistance

This past week, Delaware entered a multi-state task force to develop a plan to reopen schools and businesses in the region, including Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island.

While this seems to be a definitive move in the right direction, we must consider what good this task force can provide after businesses have been shut down or have suffered greatly for a month with little help. Businesses across the state continue to reduce capacity, lay off workers, and shut down after crumbling under the weight of this pandemic.

After all this time without action, this new effort seems to be too little, too late.

For those businesses who grasped for the few lifelines they saw available in the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, it really is too late. The $349 billion dollar fund was fully exhausted in two weeks’ time, with Delaware receiving fewer loans and less money than any other state, even states less populated.

With Congress torn on whether to authorize more funding for the PPP, where does that leave Delaware businesses?

For many, these SBA loans were the only hope to pay bills, keep employees, or even remain in business. If a Delaware business does not qualify for the state’s Hospitality Emergency Loan Program (HELP), then they truly are left without help.

Delaware issued a stay at home order on March 22 (in effect on March 24), effectively closing non-essential businesses. Twenty days later, and after offering little help to the businesses forced to shutter, we have joined a regional task force that still offers no help to struggling and failing businesses at this time.

Michigan, a state with over ten times Delaware’s population, established their task force on “general economic impact on the workforce, business activity and supply chains” on March 3, twenty days before issuing a stay at home order.

Other larger states like Ohio, Utah, and Colorado have formed their own task forces to address business needs, economic impact and recovery, and reopening their operations.

Their leaders recognized that saving livelihoods went hand-in-hand with saving lives.

Delaware’s reserves, such as the Rainy Day Fund, Strategic Fund, and money from budget smoothing have yet to be released to help ease the economic impact. Hundreds of millions of dollars in these reserves has been set aside for use in times just like this—especially the Rainy Day Fund which currently totals over $250M.

It isn’t just raining right now—it’s pouring.

Over the past four weeks, nearly 62,000 unemployment claims were filed, almost twice the amount for all of 2019. New businesses are shutting down weekly, with no hope for the future. State revenues are shrinking just as fast as money from the gross receipts tax, realty transfer tax, income tax, and more are not being generated.

Instead of utilizing hundreds of millions of existing taxpayer dollars to help ease the impact of this crisis, leadership has let businesses fail and our economy suffer.

When small businesses started failing and asked for help, they were denied. When entire industries came and begged to be saved, leadership denied them as well. When they come to you, the taxpayer, at the end of this for help with a budget deficit, it will not be a request. It will be higher taxes imposed on a population that is struggling to recover their own finances.

Delaware’s COVID-19 Capabilities

Delaware’s State Treasurer recently shared commentary regarding our state’s ability to handle the economic hardship resulting from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Treasurer Davis believes that “Delaware is well positioned to weather this storm for a number of reasons,” but most of the examples fall short of being able to help thousands of small businesses and tens of thousands of laid off or furloughed workers in the state.

The Treasurer boasted Delaware’s Rainy Day Fund, a reserve of 5% of state revenues, as one of our protections. However, according to a PEW Research Center analysis, Delaware could run only on Rainy Day Funds for 20 days if necessary, 7.9 days less than the national average.

Other “positives” listed for our economic recovery include “consistently funding our pension,” despite Delaware having total unfunded pension liabilities (guaranteed to be paid) that are 30% of the state’s personal income, or $13.75 billion.

To effectively assess the impact of this crisis and accurately model revenues, it is important to acknowledge Delaware’s true fiscal standing.

The First State ranks 44thin the nation for fiscal health, according to a Mercatus study. Our long-term liabilities are higher than the national average per capita, and is in the bottom in the nation for solvency (ability to pay debts and financial obligations).

However, if our Treasurer is correct and Delaware can help its small businesses in this time, why hasn’t it?

Alabama and seven other states have postponed various tax payments for small businesses. Iowa, Vermont, and Mississippi have suspended interest and penalties for late payments on various business taxes.

Delaware has not provided tax relief to affected businesses.

Maryland has released $50 million from its rainy day fund to help with the response, Washington $200 million, Wyoming up to $150 million, and Ohio has granted access to their fund when needed.

Delaware has not released rainy day funds for response.

Minnesota has already publicly projected that their budget surplus and rainy day fund will both disappear over the next two years while responding to and recovering from COVID-19. Idaho’s Governor has required one-percent budget cuts for all state agencies not directly involved in coronavirus response efforts, and Ohio has called for cuts up to 20%. California’s

Department of Finance has notified legislators that there should be no expectation of ability to fund new or existing policy proposals, and that revenue predictions must be revisited. New Jersey has frozen $900 million in spending in preparation for emergency financial strain, and New Mexico has denied millions for spending projects due to the outbreak.

Delaware has not addressed revenues or spending in the wake of coronavirus.

Montana took the initiative to prepare for disaster in good times, and now has $115 million in its Budget Stabilization Fund, a general fund surplus of $300 million, and $360 million in Unemployment Insurance Fund reserves.

Imagine the help Delaware could offer if our spending and saving habits had been more like Montana.

Delaware will have to play catch-up more than usual now that COVID-19 is closing businesses and crippling private and state revenues. Without growth, we cannot build new schools, provide clean water, or help our residents.

“In these deeply uncertain times, it is imperative that we lead effectively by managing the challenges of today, while preparing for the next issue over the horizon,” Delaware’s Treasurer said in her commentary. We couldn’t agree more.

Unfortunately, we may be too late. The time to prepare and exercise mindful spending is not in the midst of a pandemic, but as President John F. Kennedy said, “The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining.”

The First State Falls Behind in Pandemic Action

In the wake of coronavirus, Delaware businesses are struggling, shutting down, and asking for help. Unfortunately, many are not receiving the assistance they desperately need.

The Hospitality Emergency Loan Program (HELP)—offering no-interest loans up to $10,000 per business per month—has recently been expanded from the hospitality industry to include relief for personal care services businesses such as hair and nail salons and barbershops.

While this expansion is good news for some, other businesses are still being left behind.

This week, the languishing hotel industry asked Delaware lawmakers for tax deferments and to help their laid-off workers, but were told  this was not a priority and to wait. With over 10,000 Delawareans filing for unemployment in one week, helping businesses and laid-off workers are  just priorities they are deferring to address.

Delaware, who consistently ranks in the bottom in the nation relating to business, should take note from what some of the most business-friendly states are doing to compliment the federal coronavirus relief.

North Carolina, a top ranked state for business, is keeping its businesses and workers in mind while addressing the health crisis. The state has offered help for businesses through:

  • Expanding unemployment eligibility without placing the cost of benefits related to the coronavirus on businesses.
  • Business Edge: layoff aversion strategies and activities to help employers prevent or minimize job losses, by assessing needs and options for “at-risk” firms and addressing those needs.
  • The North Carolina Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC) is offering free assistance to small businesses to assess financial impacts of the pandemic, evaluate credit options, and apply for SBA disaster loans.

Georgia has delayed registration and registration fees for its corporations; Utah has combined health actions with economic responses in the “Utah Leads Together” program, and the Utah Governor’s Office of Management and Budget will oversee the project management to ensure the state’s economy can recover quickly from the pandemic.

A Better Delaware recommends our lawmakers enact similar policies to those listed above, as well as implementing the following recommendations from the U.S. Small Business Chamber’s “Resources to Help Your Small Business Survive the Coronavirus:”

  • Waiving fees for businesses with low margins
  • Offering no-interest loans for businesses
  • Cancelling or deferring payment of payroll taxes

Delaware leaders can help our businesses recover now. To do this, the Delaware Prosperity Partnership (DPP) can reallocate their funds used to attract new businesses to helping businesses in the state that have been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

The Governor and the legislature have a chance to minimize the impact of this health crisis on Delaware’s businesses, workers, and economy, and boost the First State’s standing nationally again. Policy decisions at this time must be made with caution, as the opportunity to further burden our businesses and economy is great.

Delaware’s senior most politicians admitted their focus is not on helping businesses at this time. Other states with more favorable business climates have already recognized the importance of this assistance and has taken steps early on to mitigate the problem.

Express the urgency of a dedicated response for businesses by contacting your legislator or reaching out to the Governor’s office.

Coronavirus and Delaware’s Future

The COVID-19 (coronavirus) epidemic has changed the day to day for many across the globe. Grocery stores struggle to keep essentials stocked, employers are mandating work-from-home policies, and health care systems are feeling a strain from testing and treatment.

Over the past week, many businesses in Delaware and nationwide have been forced to reduce service or even close their doors. Workers are concerned about lost wages, and business owners are facing massive revenue shortfalls.

Both are concerned about their ability to pay bills.

New cases are cropping up every day in the First State, and things will only get worse. Businesses will need help that comes from both the community and the state, and that help should not come at the expense of others struggling at this time: taxpayers.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has released “Resources to Help Your Small Business Survive the Coronavirus,” including some temporary measures lawmakers can take to help business survive the impact such as:

  • Waiving fees for businesses with low margins
  • Offering no-interest loans for businesses
  • Cancelling or deferring payment of payroll taxes

Governor Carney has already taken some steps to help businesses with programs like the Hospitality Emergency Loan Program (HELP). Under HELP, businesses are eligible to receive state support to pay rent, utilities, and other major overhead costs.

The state has also formally requested loans from the U.S. Small business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Declaration to help support over 25,000 small businesses in Delaware. Small businesses and non-profits would be eligible for up to $2 million each in low-interest loans.

As for the worker, unemployment must be revisited in a manner that expands eligibility and benefits without adding a burden onto already struggling or inoperable businesses.

There is still no such thing as a free lunch, and as our state’s government works to protect small businesses and workers, the total cost must be monitored closely. Increasing taxes to cover these programs will hurt Delawareans, and so will cutting essential programs to cover loss of revenue.

While a health crisis may be an extreme scenario, it is the perfect example of why our government must watch its spending habits in better times. Luckily, Delaware has a Rainy Day Fund that could be utilized to offset some of the financial burden associated with the critical programs coming from the Governor’s office, but requires a super majority vote from the General Assembly to spend. Additional coverage could come from the reserved monies from budgeting 98% of revenues, or Budget Smoothing. This $100M+ can be spent at the Governor’s discretion. However, our savings account is only so big, taxpayer pockets so deep, and business revenues so sustainable.

As the situation improves, it is imperative that our state leaders move forward with caution in any new spending or programs while revenues recover. Earlier in 2020, a $200 million “surplus” was attempted to be spent on various new spending projects. Now, that $200 million likely does not exist, digging the state into a worse position to help Delaware businesses and workers, and to recover from the impact of the coronavirus.

That revenue was from increasing taxes on Delawareans in recent years. The same can happen again if the state raises taxes to cover spending from the coronavirus, or to fund new, long-term programs deemed necessary because of it.

There won’t be tax cuts or a return of your money—so what will the new “surplus” be used for in five years?

Irresponsible fiscal policy now will likely hurt Delaware residents and businesses in a way that cannot be ignored or excused.

A sound recovery from Coronavirus will be tough job for our state leaders in the coming months, who must consider how to not worsen our already struggling business climate and interstate economic competitiveness in the aftermath.

Let’s have the foresight to implement recovery policies that encourage economic and job growth, a better place for businesses to grow and thrive, and an economy that lifts up Delawareans as a whole.

Why pro-business is not anti-worker

Supporting the economy isn’t a partisan issue—so why has it become one?

In Delaware, “pro-business” is frequently tied to “anti-worker,” but the opposite is true.

Who employs these workers that we want to support? Businesses!

By hurting these employers, workers and their families suffer lower incomes, less hours, and even layoffs.

Think of it this way: if the government passed a restrictive regulation on public housing, there would be an uproar about its impact on the recipients of that program and their access to housing. The move would be seen as one that hurts the people, or an “attack” on lower-income families.

The same is true with a restrictive regulation on business. In this instance, the providers are the companies, stores, and small businesses, while the good are the jobs they supply. Legislation that is anti-business is blatantly anti-worker and anti-jobs, and should be seen as a move that hurts the people as well.

It’s odd that a policy position that offers more jobs, better job security, higher pay, and higher government revenues divides Democrats and Republicans from the local level up through the Presidency. These benefits support groups that fall on both sides, including low-income families, middle-class families, communities, minority groups, children, schools, churches, and more.

In a better informed government, lawmakers would work across the aisle to support legislation that actually promotes job growth, supports businesses, and strengthens the economy, in an effort to work for the people, instead of duping them.

If our elected officials could agree on better fiscal policy, both sides would have the capability to help their respective communities, and the public would finally win in this political game, not to mention that more money would naturally go into the budget to support programs for education, health care, infrastructure, housing, and more.

So why is it so divisive? The answer is the same thing that causes most strife in governance: politics.

What is truly best for the people can make for bad headlines in the short-term and impact re-election or donor support.

“New Policy Erases Student Loan Debt for Millions Nationwide” is a far better headline for student loan forgiveness than what the headline for the true, long-term outcome would be: “Erasing Students Loans Cripples Economy as Trillions of Dollars go Unpaid.”

The next time you hear a lawmaker denounce a pro-business policy for being anti-worker or for putting business over the people, consider how a business can support its workers when their operations take a hit, and why both sides can’t align on this issue.