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Restaurateurs raise heat over increased restrictions

From Delaware Business Times

WILMINGTON — As Gov. John Carney rolled back indoor dining back to Phase 1 requirements of 30% of indoor capacity to slow the spread of COVID-19, Delaware’s restaurant industry faces difficult decisions this winter amid an estimated $900 million loss through the pandemic.

“Look, it means that full-service restaurants that rely on that in-person dining experience will be hit hard,” Xavier Teixido, owner of Harry’s Hospitality Group, told the Delaware Business Times. “You cannot make money at 30% capacity. The No. 1 decision restaurants are going to face is the value in staying open with staff there to serve 30% of the guests that were allowed versus the hit in closing restaurants.”

Gianmarco Martuscelli, owner of Klondike Kate’s in Newark and La Casa Pasta in Glasgow, said the industry was “disappointed” by the renewed restrictions. Martuscelli, who serves as treasurer for the Delaware Restaurant Association board, said that owners had hoped for a curfew, like Maryland has instituted, rather than reduced capacity because it would allow them to retain more of their dinner business. Now, however, some owners are deciding whether to scrap indoor dining altogether and return to curbside takeout only, he said.

Since June, Delaware has been operating in Phase 2, allowing 60% capacity of fire code capacity in restaurants although bar seating was restricted in many Sussex County beach communities in the height of summer. Carney eased those restrictions on beach bars in September — allowing patrons in if they reserved a seat and ordered food — and lifted them entirely this month ahead of winter.

Lisa DiFebo-Osias, owner of DiFebo’s Restaurants in Bethany and Rehoboth beaches, said her anger comes when she walks into a store and sees employees without masks on because they did not want to wear them. In comparison, the DiFebo’s staff works eight-hour shifts while wearing N95 masks without taking them off once.

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