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Commentary: Delaware government must serve and protect public

From the News Journal

By Richard Gebelein and Robert Marshall

As two former Delaware public servants with a combined 75-plus years of experience in Delaware government, spanning the executive, legislative and judicial branches, we are concerned with the state of our state as it faces the challenges of 2020.

Delaware needs to address the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the highest number of unemployed people in our history, as well as structural issues in government and taxation. Decisions made this year will significantly alter how Delawareans live in the coming decades. Those decisions should be made through a process that meets both the letter and the spirit of our sunshine laws.

We come from different political parties, and we have different views on many issues. During our public service careers, we have debated those issues. In many cases, compromise was possible, and we could join to support positive change. When we did this, the process was aired publicly in legislative and administrative hearings. The media covered those public hearings, and the process was open. Investigative reporters sought out dissenting views, reported on them and uncovered improprieties where they existed.

Today, Delaware faces unprecedented challenges, and yet, there is little public discussion of the steps to be taken to address these matters. The “People’s Hall,” aka Legislative Hall in Dover, is closed to the public.

As an example of decisions to come, it appears that the governor and one judge have determined that there must be a reassessment of the value of real property for tax purposes. Any reassessment will have serious tax and property value implications for everyone who owns a home, a business property, etc. This reassessment will mostly impact those middle-class families whose biggest asset is their home. Historically, a rise in real estate taxes may be accompanied by a decrease in the actual value of the property.

Just as in the catastrophic real estate collapse of 2008, middle-class homeowners could be forced from their homes. How to conduct a reassessment, limit the size of tax increases and/or seek alternative funding for schools should be publicly debated to allow for input from the public. Many of these impacted homeowners have been negatively affected by COVID-19 already and may not be able to bear a tax increase, as well.

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